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Monday, May 22, 2017

The Strange Universe of Genealogy #virginiapioneers

The Expanding Universe of Genealogy

CahokiaCahokia As more data is unfolded from expanding resources, such as DNA and solor technology which fingerprints the location of ancient villages and burials on the map, it opens up a new vestitude of thought for genealogists. We are beginning to see evidence of large cities of Native Americans and their migrations. I, for one, assumed that the large mounds were burial grounds. Yet, excavations in reveal the site of buildings constructed similar to those in Egypt and South America. Over 200 mounds were found in the Mississippi River area alone. Cahokia, a sophisticated village near East St. Louis in Missouri reveals the remnants of more than a thousand prehistoric houses and the base of an earthen pyramid, which is one of dozens which towered above the original settlement. There are 120 massive pyramids of earth, more than twice the number of any other site. The various Indian cultures appear to be migrations from Europe and the Middle East. The Cherokees, for example, in North Georgia and North Carolina appear to descend from Sephardi Jews who resided in the Iberian Peninsula inn the late 15th century before the Alhambra Decree of 1492 (banishment) by the Catholic monarchs in Spain. Their origin was discovered after DNA samples were taken from various cultures around the world. The Separdi Jews (later Cherokees), it seems, migrated to America about 1600. History did not quite get it right. Discounting the fact that during ancient times, many ships were upon the seas, with scattered unrecorded settlements in Nova Scotia and upon the North America and South American continent, an apparent loss of ship manifests is also a factor in the loss of so many settlements and cultures. We have the History Books' version of one big discovery in 1492, and that ended the discussion for a long while. But genealogists know that an untold number of migrations occcurred and that the records only scan the surface. Trace your families in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia on 8 genealogy sites

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Saturday, May 20, 2017

Charles City County VA Wills and Estates #virginiapioneers

Charles City County, Virginia Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages



Shirley Plantation
Shirley Plantation, home of Charles Carter.

Charles City County was named after the son of King James who later became King Charles I of England. It was one of four boroughs created by the Virginia Company in 1619. Westover Plantation was built about 1730 by William Byrd II, founder of Richmond and Petersburg, and features English boxwoods and colonial gardens; open to the public. Other plantations located in this county go along the James River, viz: Shirley Plantation, Berkeley Plantation, Westover Plantation, Sherwood Forest Plantation, and Greenway Plantation. Charles City is the county seat. The Carter wills of Shirley Plantation and Ladd wills are available on this website as well as many other famous Virginians who resided in this county. Anyone searching for their ancestors in Charles City County will no doubt run across the famous families who built the wealthy plantations and generated the local economy. 

Charles City County Wills, Estates, Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Marriages
  • Marriages to 1699
Miscellaneous Wills
  • Byrd, William, LWT (1700)
  • Byrd, William, LWT (1774)
  • Clay, John, LWT (transcript)
  • England, Francis, LWT (transcript)
  • Gregory, John, Jr., LWT (transcript)
  • Harrison, Benjamin, LWT (transcript)
  • Izard, Rebecca, LWT (transcript)
  • Munford, Robert, LWT (transcript)
  • Munford, William, LWT (transcript)
  • Rogers, John, LWT, transcript Tyler, John, LWT (transcript
Digital Images of Wills 1789 to 1808 
Testators: Anderson, David Austin, William Ballard, Thomas Ballard, William Bartow, James Bates, James Beeck, Benjamin Benford, John Benge, James Berkley, Benjamin Binns, Mary Blanks, Elizabeth Blanks, James Blanks, John Bradley, Dancy Bradley, James Bradley, Joseph Brown, Abraham Brown, Sarah Bullifont, James Burton, Elizabeth Burton, William Carter, Charles of Shirley Plantation Carter, Mildred Carter, Robert Cary, Robert Charles, Lydia Charles, Phillip Charles, Willis Sr. Christian, Gideon Christian, William Clarke, Sarah Cocke, Jane Crew, Benjamin Crew, Benjamin (2) Crew, John Drake, Robert Drinkard, William Durfey, Francis Durfey, Samuel Duke, Henry Edmondson, Elizabeth Edmondson, Margaret Edward, William Finch, Ann Finch, Edward Finch, Elizabeth Folkes, William Fry, Robert Gill, Ingraham Gilliam, Ann Graves, William Griffith, Thomas Hardyman, Littlebury Harris, Frances or Francis Harris, James Harrison, Benjamin Jr. Harrison, James Harwood, William Hogg, Jessey Hurt, James Irby, Hardyman Irby, John Johnson, Jacob Knibb, John Lacy, Henry Ladd, Amos Ladd, Anna Ladd,James Ladd, William Lyon, Daniel Major, Martha Manable, Edward McBrown, Allen Merry, David Minge, Ann Shields Mountcastle, Joseph Munford, Robert Murrell, Thomas New, Richard Oley, William Parrish, Elizabeth Pavely, John Perry, Littleberry Phillips, Elizabeth Quick, Henry Randolph, William Sr. Roach, James Russell, Edward Southall, Henry Southall, James Spraggins, Elizabeth Spraggins, Thomas Stagg, Thomas Sr. Vaughan, William Shields Walker, Rebecca Walker, Richardson Wilkinson, David Willcox, Hannah Williams, Brazure Williamson, Frances Willis, Eady
Digital Images of Wills 1808 to 1824
Testators: Virginia Pioneers Adams, John ;Apperson, Martha ;Ballard, John; Barrow, Philip; Bates, James Sr. ;Blanks, Thomas; Bradley, Benjamin; Bradley, John ;Bradley, Marston; Bradley, Thomas; Bradley, William ; Brewer, Eleanor ;Brown, Dixon;Byrd, Ann Willing ;Byrd, Mary ; Carter, Anne ;Cary, David ;Christian, John; Christian, Susanna; Christian, William ;Cole, Major ;Cole, Tally ;Coupland, Ann; Cowles, Nathaniel; Crew, Jacob ;Crew, John Sr. ;Demville, Elizabeth ; Dixon, Ann ;Dixon, Anthony Tucker; Edloe, Ann ;Egmon, Cornelius; Egmon, Frances ;Emery, Mary ;Evans, Robert; Ferrel, Caleb ;Filbales, John ; Finch, Richmond; Folkes, Catherine; Fry, Elizabeth ;Gannaway, Thomas; Gill, Thomas ;Gill, William ;Gilliam, Jeffery; Glidewell, Drury; Gregory, Elley ; Griffith, Amy ;Griffith, William; Hadin, Lucretia ;Hamblett, George; Hamblett, Thomas; Harrison, Braxton; Harrison, Collier ;Harwood, Elizabeth; Howell, William ;Hughes, Jeremiah; Irby, Francis Irby, Littleberry; Ireland, John ; Kirby, Sarah ;Ladd, James D.; Ladd, Jesse ;Ladd, John ;Ladd, Joseph; Lightfoot, Philip I.; Lightfoot, William ;Maddox, Michael ;Major, Edward ; Major, John ;Mannin, John; Miles, Richard; Minge, George William Hunt; Moody, Matthew ;Mountcastle, Elizabeth; Murrell, William M. ; Nance, William ;Nelson, William ;New, Jesse ;New, Sally ;Philbales, Mary; Raglin, Richard ;Roper, David ;Ross, Ann ;Royall, John; Royall, William ; Snipes, John ;Southall, Ann ;Southall, Philip; Southall, William; Towler, Luke ;Trappell, Martha; Tyler, John ;Vaughan, Henry; Vaughan, James ; Vaughan, Sarah ;Warden, Joseph ;Whitt, Isham ;Wilkinson, Thomas; Wills, John ;Winston, Susanna
Indexes
  • Index to Charles City Inventories and Guardian Accounts 1789 to 1808
  • Index to Charles City Wills and Inventories 1808 to 1824
Miscellaneous
  • 1704 Quit Rent Rolls

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Friday, May 19, 2017

Skirmish with British During War of 1812 #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy


Skirmish between the Virginia Militia and the British during the War of 1812

Farnham ChurchFew people remember that during October of 1814, a force of British troops came up the Coan River and marched to Heathsville. Thrn proceeded to march up through the Neck to Richmond where they pillaged, burned and destroyed. Upon reaching the North Farnham Church, County, a skirmish was fought between the raiders and the Virginia militia, leaving bullet holes in the walls of the church to mark the battle. 

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Swathmoor Hall #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy

Swarthmoor Hall, the Founder of the Society of Friends (Quakers)

Swarthmoor HallSwarthmoor Hall was the home of George Fox, the founder of the Society of Friends, and the place where the "Friends of Truth" and "Children of Light," worshipped. The locality is one he always loved and where he gained his most enthusiastic converts. There is an old-fashioned bridge and stream nearby, and the stump of a tree which offers a pleasant seat. The name, Swarthmoor, is said to have derived its name from the Flemish general, "Bold Martin Swart," or Swartz, a valiant soldier of noble family, who, in 1487, with Lord Lovel and the Earls of Lincoln and Kildare, encamped here with an invading army of 7,000 German and Irish troops, who had landed at the Pile of Fouldrey with the object of placing Lambert Simnel on the throne of England. Despite this tradition, the name has a much earlier origin, back to the time of Duke William of Normandy. At a later date, when the soldiers of King Charles had entered Furness and "plundered the place very sore," as the old chronicle has it, Colonel Rigby, the Parliamentarian commander, temporarily withdrew from Thurland Castle and started in hot pursuit; and we are told that the Roundheads, after stopping on Swarthmoor to pray, marched on to Lindale, a couple of miles further, where they fought with such vehemence and resolution that the unlucky Cavaliers were put to flight. 

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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Despoilers of the Middle Church in Colonial Days #virginiapioneersnet

Despoilers of the The Middle Church 

1895 Orange VirginiaBetween 1750 and 1758 Andrew Shepherd made a gift of an altar piece to a church in Orange County located about three miles southeast of the Orange County Court House on the old road leading to Fredericksburg situated on the land of Mrs. James Taylor, Sr. During the conflict with Great Britain, this church was destroyed and the very bricks carried off and the altar pieces donated by Andrew Shepherd torn from the altar and attached as ornamental appendages to some articles of household furniture. The ancient communion plate, a large silver cup and paten with the name of the parish engraved upon it, was rescued and is now in possession of St. Thomas Church at Orange. The despoilers then went to the churchyard and carried away tombstones for other purposes while breaking others in the ground. Vandalizing churchyards was not uncommon during this period because Virginians had "been made" to attend church and pay tithing. Source: Old Churches and Families of Virginia by Meade, Vol. II. 

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Tuesday, May 16, 2017

"The First Shots of the Revolutionary War were in Alamance County" #northcarolinapioneers

The Battle of Alamance

William TryonDid you know that the Battle of Alamance fought on May 16, 1771 shed the first blood of the struggle for American Independence? It is said that the shots fired at Lexington were "heard around the world." but let it not be forgotten that almost four years before the day of Lexington, shots were fired at Alamance, and that Lexington continued the fight. William Tryon, the Royal Governor of North Carolina, was referred to as the "wolf" because he oppressed the people of his province to the point where they were obliged to do one or two things, viz: resist him or become slaves. A group of patriots resolved to resist and formed themselves into an organization known as "Regulators." 2,000 to 3,000 arose partly armed and met the forces of the royal Governor at Alamance. "Lay down your guns or I will fire!" shouted the British commander. "Fire and be damned!" shouted back the leader of the Regulators. However, the Regulators were defeated and dispersed. 



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