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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Tory Forces in York Co. SC #genealogy #southcarolinapioneersnet

Captain Christian Huck Looted the Bratton House


BrattonsvilleThe home of Colonel William Bratton, a local militia commander in the Revolutionary War, was built during the 1770s. On July 11 of 1780, Tory forces serving under Captain Christian Huck looted the Bratton house and threatened his wife. The Loyalist, encamped about a mile from the Bratton house, at the James Williamson plantation, was awakened at daybreak by Patriot troops whose commanders included Colonel Bratton. Captain Huck was killed during the battle. 

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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Adventurers on the High Seas #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Adventurers on the High Seas

shipsEnglish merchants had to apply for a license to load their ships to go to Virginia. A case in point was a license issued to all of the part owners and investors in a number of vessels, via: Hopeful Luke, the Margaret, the John of Berkshire, the Cretian, the Anthony, the Brothers Adventure, the Henry & David, and the Thomas & Anne. The King took advantage of every opportunity to charge tariffs to those doing business to and from the colonies as well as the colonists themselves, who imported goods for their American homes. It all started quite early, in the early 1600's and despite the hardships suffered by colonists, continued throughout the colonial period. The seamen of that era were true and brave adventurers for their willingness to bear up against hurricanes, storms, rotting of fruits and vegetables, shipwrecks and losses due to delays in weather and other causes, is simply amazing. The investment on both sides of the Atlantic was risky. There were a lot of fires in Jamestown, and early on the colonial governor ordered that only brick houses to be constructed. Also, the colonists paid more for imported bricks, lead window panes, nails, and hewn wood materials. The colonists tore down old buildings and used the nails and plankwood for other purposes, not wasting anything. It is not uncommon to read the inventories in the old Colonial wills which inventory the plankwood count and every detail of colonial life. 

More information concerning early settlers to Virginia, their adventures and origins, is found under "Origins" and available to members of Virginia Pioneers

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

The Expanding Universe of Discoveries Helpful to Genealogists #vagenealogy #virginiapioneersnet

The Expanding Universe of Genealogy

CahokiaCahokia As more data is unfolded from expanding resources, such as DNA and solor technology which fingerprints the location of ancient villages and burials on the map, it opens up a new vestitude of thought for genealogists. We are beginning to see evidence of large cities of Native Americans and their migrations. I, for one, assumed that the large mounds were burial grounds. Yet, excavations in reveal the site of buildings constructed similar to those in Egypt and South America. Over 200 mounds were found in the Mississippi River area alone. Cahokia, a sophisticated village near East St. Louis in Missouri reveals the remnants of more than a thousand prehistoric houses and the base of an earthen pyramid, which is one of dozens which towered above the original settlement. There are 120 massive pyramids of earth, more than twice the number of any other site. The various Indian cultures appear to be migrations from Europe and the Middle East. The Cherokees, for example, in North Georgia and North Carolina appear to descend from Sephardi Jews who resided in the Iberian Peninsula inn the late 15th century before the Alhambra Decree of 1492 (banishment) by the Catholic monarchs in Spain. Their origin was discovered after DNA samples were taken from various cultures around the world. The Separdi Jews (later Cherokees), it seems, migrated to America about 1600. History did not quite get it right. Discounting the fact that during ancient times, many ships were upon the seas, with scattered unrecorded settlements in Nova Scotia and upon the North America and South American continent, an apparent loss of ship manifests is also a factor in the loss of so many settlements and cultures. We have the History Books' version of one big discovery in 1492, and that ended the discussion for a long while. But genealogists know that an untold number of migrations occcurred and that the records only scan the surface. Trace your families in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia on 8 genealogy sites

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Great Documents of the Past #ncgenealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Great Documents of the Past

captivesGenealogists are sometimes inclined to overlook records which will help to ferret out important details. Census records are not the end all in discovering ancestors! More importantly (after the census research), court house records should be thoroughly examined at every locale where ancestors ever resided. The place to begin is in the county where the ancestor resided, as well as the adjoining counties. The reason is that boundaries were always expanding or diminishing in order to create new counties. Too, families moved about, with friends and relatives in the vicinity. The group of people who shared a community, farm acreage,or town are suspect as relatives. Children married neighbors, and that record exists somewhere in the community. Church minute books, graveyards, deed records, minute books, records in the Inferiory Court detailing the maintenance of roads, and so on and so on. And sometimes it is rewarding to read the last will and testaments of everyone who resided in the community during a certain time-span. That is where real events are discovered. My most recent find was the discovery that two distant cousins of my ancestor were taken by Indians as slaves, and that the father (after 30 years) lamented that he wished to provide them, should they ever return. One should look twice at a neighbor who purchased items from an estate sale, or witnessed a deed. The adjoining property owners listed in tax digests are noteworthy. Once all the tidbits of information is gathered, it begins to make sense. The reading of deeds during a prescribed time period is also helpful, especially deeds of gift (to heirs) and Marriage Contracts. Yes, another place to find marriages is in deed records! 

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Monday, November 13, 2017

Ruins on SC Coastal Highway #scgenealogy #scancestors #southcarolinapioneersnet

Ruins on Highway 17 (coastal Highway)

Colleton RuinsSeveral Revolutionary War skirmishes occurred in Colleton County and the state legislature met in the town of Jacksonboro in 1782 while Charleston was occupied by the British. In 1828 the first nullification meeting in the state was held in Walterboro. The Revolutionary War hero Isaac Hayne (1745-1781) was a Colleton resident, as were politicians Rawlins Lowndes (1721-1800) and William Lowndes (1782-1822 Cotton was king in the region. After the War Between the States, Northern carpetbaggers bought the land for taxes and used it as hunting preserves.

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"The Tickler" on Olden Days #kentuckygenealogy #kentuckypioneers


The Tickler
By Jeannette Holland Austin

the ticklerKentuckians loved their fairs and markets. But it was the auctioneer who originated stock sales on the open square on market-day. Kentucky had its county court days which included legal business at the court house followed by fairs and markets and country gentlemen, wearing their broad-brimmed straw hats, would attend and enjoy socializing with his neighbors. When the prosperous Kentucky farmer arose from his bed each morning, he walked out into the porch, stretched himself, and looked at the sun while he awaited breakfast. On the prescribed county court day, his wife also wished to attend, as well as the children. So away they went, the farmer on horseback or in the family carriage. There were many carriages along the roadway, all going to the fair. 
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Sunday, November 12, 2017

"Youngdeer" - Chief in Paulding County #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Youngdeer

YoungdeerThere was an Indian family of Tidwells who resided in Paulding County. When the Dawes Commission started accepting applications in the Court of Claims to appropriate Oklahoma lands to Indians which could prove at least 1/32nd blood, information concerning John Tidwell was written in a number of applications. Tidwell, a Cherokee, claimed that he was the son of "Youngdeer" There was an Indian, David Cordrey from Forsyth County, who died on "the trail of tears" and his name appeared on the 1835 roll. According to tradition, Cordrey was married to Sarah Tidwell, a daughter of "Youngdeer." Although all of the claims declaring descent from "Youngdeer" were rejected, the Tidwell and Cordrey families did reside in Forsyth and Paulding Counties, with certain of them traveling west during the 1890s. This means that they were absent from being on any of the earlier Indian Rolls, which we used as proof of Indian blood. However, the evidence points that Sarah Cordrey, a daughter of Thomas Cordery (born 1782, died 14 July 1842) was the wife of "Youngdeer". David Cordery was a son of Thomas Cordery who died 1842 in Forsyth County, Georgia and his wife, Susannah Sonicooie who died 1818 in Suwanee Old Town, Gwinnett County. The job of the genealogist is to search the Census, Cherokee Rolls, Chapman Rolls, Baker Rolls, etc. as well as the 35,000 applications present to the Dawes Commission records in the U. S. Court of Claims between 1906 and 1910. Some of these records are available to members of Georgia Pioneers 

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