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Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Names of Kentucky Ancestors --- > Bracken County



Bracken County Wills, Estates, Deeds

Land in Bracken County
Bracken County was organized in 1796 from parts of Mason and Campbell Counties. Originally, the county extended to southern Nicholas County (north of the Ohio River and west of the Licking River). It has two creeks (named for William Bracken), the Big and Little Bracken. William Bracken was a surveyor by trade and visited the area in 1773. He was later killed by Indians during the Northwest Indian War. The first county seat was Augusta, Kentucky but was moved to Woodward Crossing (Brooksville). 

Bracken County Probate Records available to members of Kentucky Pioneers

Miscellaneous Wills and Estates
  • Black, James Sr.
  • Bunts, Michael
  • Hardwitch, James
  • James, Samuel
  • Lowe, Isaac
  • Settles, Elizabeth
more

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Genealogy. Who are the "Blue Bloods?" #virginiapioneersnet


Who are the "Blue Bloods?"

aristocratsThe term "aristocrat" refers colloquially to persons who inherit social status whether due to membership in the official nobility or the monied upper class. During 1834 Blue blood was an English idiom noble birth or descent. The idiom originates from the ancient and medieval societies of Europe and distinguishes an upper class. Ironically, the blue blood vessels of the upper non-working class appeared through their untanned skin! Actually, according to Robert Lacey, it was the Spaniards who provided the notion that the blood of an aristocrat was not red, rather blue. Find your Ancestors in Fauquier Co. VA 


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Genealogy. A Gentleman's Purse in Colonial Days #virginiapioneers.net

A Gentleman's Purse

gentleman's purseWomen did not carry pocketbooks during the 17th to late 19th century, but they had at least one pair of invisible pockets sewn underneath their petticocoat. A pocket was a handy place to keep everyday implements, such as a pincushion, thimble, pencil case, knife and scissors, but so far as money was concerned, coinage was heavy. Many pockets were handmade and they were acquired from the local haberdasher and presented as gifts. Yet despite the effort to conceal pockets, many were stolen from women by cutting the strings. Thus the common phrase "pickpocket" described a thief. The gentlemen had pockets sewn into the linings of their coats, waistcoats and breeches. However, they did have a purse. My guess would be that gentlemen carried no more than five or six shillings in the purse.
Find your Ancestors in Fauquier Co. VA


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Monday, April 23, 2018

Where to Search after Finding the Ancestors in Census Records #georgiapioneers #genealogy

Where to Search after Finding the Ancestors in Census Records

puzzleA through examination of census records from 1790 to (currently) 1940 is just the beginning of the hunt for ancestors. One needs contact family members, ask for family bibles, go to cemeteries, acquire county maps, etc. But the gut of genealogy is found in county records, from ca 1500 in Europe to the present in America. One must exhaust the county records everywhere that the ancestors resided. It is a tedious but informative and rewarding task. One can read the work of others, books, etc., but the most accurate answers are derived from deeds, tax digests, estates, wills, annual returns, estate inventories and sales, receipts, marriage records, and maps from the tax accessor's office. Too, one must also research the parent county and surrounding counties, as well as follow the (location of land grants) and lotteries. People were on the move. Nevertheless, factual information is in the county records Remember that!  Wilkes Co. GA Ancestors. See Names

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The Gallant Travis Killed 15 People as he Lay Sick in his Bed

The Gallant Travis Killed 15 People as he lay sick in his bed - before he took a shot in the head

The Alamo 

Everyone remembers the hopeless fight of 100 gallant Kentuckians led by Colonels Travis and Bowie.  The death scene of Davie Crocket as seen by Colonel R. L. Crompton as sought out by a reporter.  

"In the winter of 1834," Colonel Crompton began, "I left my house in Massachusetts for the purpose of seeking my fortune in the west. My destination was Lexington, Kentucky, but while on the Ohio River, I fell in with a party of young men who were on their way to join Colonel Travis in Texas, and carried away by their vivid pictures of life of adventurous excitement that awaited them, I joined the band without much knowledge as to the right or wrong of the cause which I pledged myself to sustain. We traveled by boat to New Orleans and there took ship for Galveston. Here were procured horses and proceeded to join the Texas forces, then operating in the neighborhood of San Antonio de Bexar.  Anything less like an army in appearance it wold be hard to imagine.  Uniform there was none, each dressing to sit his own peculiar fancy,and the men were as various as their attire."
"Shortly after my arrival I attached myself to the command of that magnificent Tennesseean, Colonel Milam, and soon became devotedly attached to him.  He was a man of splendid charater, without the sternness of Travis or the strong flabor of blakguardism that hung about Houston."
"As soon as we had gathered sufficient strength we attacked the Mexican forces in San Antonio. They far outnumbered us and a desprate struggle ensued.  For days we fought in the streets and among the adobe houses, each of which was a miniature fortress.  With picks and spedes we dug our way through the walls fro house to house, thus avoiding the great loss which would have resulted from any attempt at a direct storm.  The fight for the Vereminda house was fierce and bloody, but at last we drove the Mexicans out and took possession.  But our triumph was soon turned to mourning, for shortly after it was captured the beloeved Milam fell dead, shot by a Mexican who lay concealed behind a wall on the opposite side of the San Antonio River.  We at length obtained possession of the town, but did not retain it long, as the advance of President Santa Anna compelled us to withdraw, leaving Travis with less than 150 men to garrison the town."
"I shall never forget the day when young Maverick rode into our camp with the news that Travis, refusing to retreat, was shut up in the Alamo and surrounded by an over-whelming force."
"I do not know what possessed me, but when I heard that Houston had decided that he was too weak to march to the relief of Travis (as indeed was the case). I determined to gallop to San Antonio, endeavor to steal through the Mexican lines and join my old Kentucky friends, who were nearly all within the garrison walls. I reached San Antonio without difficulty, and found that one assault had already been made, and that the besieged had more than held "
fired upon and wounded, and owed my escape from death to the darkness. With difficulty I made my way to the house of a Mexican I had befriended during our occupation of the city, and he generously agreed to conceal me in his house. A narrow window commanded an excellent view of one front of the Alamo wall, and from this point, I could see nearly all of that memorable struggle. Day after day the Mexican fire was kept up, and time after time were their storming columns hurled against the old church wall, which formed the Texan rampart. But nothing could disturb the calm desperation of the defenders, and at the close of each day the lone star flag floated as proudly, and apparently as securely as ever from the roof of the mission. The Mexican losses were fearful. Their clumsy escopetas were no match for the long Hawkins rifles in the hands of the Kentucky and Tennessee backwoodsmen. Hundreds fell every day, but their losses were little felt in that overwhelming host, while every man of the garrison who died was an irreparable injury.  The line along the wall grew very thin, but still there was no thought of surrender admidst that gallant band. At length, when death and wounds had reduced the poor handful, to half its original numbers, the Mexicans effected a lodgment in an undeended portion of the wall, and poured in by the hundreds."
"Although there was now no hope of success, the brave Texans fought as steadily and firmly as on the first day of the seige.  From room to room went the fight, and the puny Mexicans learned by bitter experience what deadly weapons bowie knives and clubbed rifles were in the hands of desperate Americans.  But human endurance has its limits, and at length Santa Anna was master of the Alamo, but not until the last American lay cold in death."
"From my window I ccould hear the shouts and yells and see the struggling figures. When all was over, I begged my host to go into the Alamo and bring the news of all that had occurred.  He came back in an hour or two, and said that such a shambles had never been seen.  The dead were heaped in wild confusion all over the building, and the gutters fairly ran with blood.  In a room on the ground floor was the corpse of Colonel Bowie, who had been butchered upon his sick bed. Not far from his was found the brave and eccentric .  But the most impressive sight was in a small room in the upper story, where the gallant Travis lay, a bullet hole in his forehead, surrounded by the corpses of fifteen Mexicans who had died by his own hand. Of the Texans, no one survived, but they did not died unavenged, as 1,000 Mexicans fell before less than 150. It was well said that "Thermopylae had its messenger of defeat, the Alama had none."

Source: Story from the St. Louis Globe-Democrat to the Atlanta Journal 24 February 1887.


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Genealogy. How Coinage was Hidden #northcarolinapioneers

How Coinage was Hidden

Covington HomeWay back in biblical times, the accumulated wealth of a family was kept under guard in a building. The process of retaining physical wealth before paper money, presented problems. A pirates chest filled with coins and jewelry was considered treasure. Privateers were hired by European countries to intercept Spanish vessels on the high seas and seize treasure stolen by the Spanish from Brazil and other South American Countries. The bounty was split, with most of the treasure going to the county providing the letters of marque. Until paper money, art and statues made of gold and other precious ore tended to reveal a wealthy family estate. Although banking houses were used, coins were too heavy to carry around. During war time, to prevent the enemy from seizing an estate, people hid coinage in their flower garden. When word came to Atlantans that General Sherman en route, money and other valuables was hidden just about everywhere. While "Underground Atlanta" was being constructed, a great treasure of gold was found hidden in a brick wall. Also, according to family stories, while refugeeing to Kennesaw, many jumped the train and hid treasure along the way. 
Person Co. NC Ancestor Records


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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Good Plowable Dirt #georgiapioneers #genealogy


Good Plowable Dirt

plowing with oxenTracing the ancestors can be truly difficult. In fact, it is a down-right brain exercise, tryiing to remember names, dates and places. And then reason out why people took the plunge and crossed the seas, and then moved around the country so much. It seemed that they were on an endess trek to find the proper home. Or, more directly put, they were searching for fertile land simply because good plowable dirt was the means to prosperity. Consider all of the ingredients which comprize a healthy pliable soil. To, in order to enrich the soi to plant a few flowers we go to the store and purchase bags of dirt . In the olden days, a hand-driven plow and/or mule was used to perform the bemoaning physical task. See names of Wilkinson County Ancestors

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Where is the Sword of the Gallant Captain Reid at the Smithsonian Institute?


The Sword of the Gallant Captain Reid was deposited at the National Museum (Smithsonian) with a Sketch of the Hero. Is it Lost?

It is interesting to note that a search for Capt. Reid's sword at the Smithsonian was not found.

1783-1861
"There has lain upon the desk of the president for some time a plain, steel scabbarded sword, old fashioned in style and servicable rather than elegant, slightly curved, somewhat battered and generally a weapon that looks as though it had seen service. And it has; and service too, in one of the most heroic actions described in American history."

"A day or two ago the president sent this sword to Congress, and it will probably become the duty of the National museum, in which as many valuable relics are deposited, to give it a place in which it may be seen in company with a sketch of the hero and the herioc contest that make it sacred."

The battle saber was given to the president by Colonel Samuel C. Reid, the son of the late Captain Samuel Chester Reid who commanded the United States prvate armed brig of war General Armstrong at the battle of Fayal, in September, 1814.  The Armstrong was a little brig of but 240 tons, carrying but seven-guns and ninety men. She was attacked in the neutral waters of Azore islands by a British squadron, the frigate rota and the sloop of war Carnation, with a total amount of 136 guns and 2,000 men!   During the battle, the British lost over 300 (killed and wounded) of their picked men and officers, while the Armstrong lost but two killed and seven wounded.

The action was called the "Thermopylae of the Ocean".

"The height of heroism and romantic chivalry were displayed by Capt. Reid and his crew in the last act of this extraordinary naval drama.  After scuttling his vesse to save her from capture he went ashore with his men and arms when the commander of the squadron, Admiral Llod, demanded their surrender and threatened to send 500 men to take them.  Reid retired with his men to an old gothic convent, which he fortified, knocked away the drawbridge, ran up the American flag, and bade the enemy defiance. Lloyd quailed under this last exhibition of heroic courage, saying they were demons and not men."

The Conquest to Capture Louisiana. The sqadron under Lloyd was on its way to the island of Jamaica to join the great fleet assembled there under Admiral Lord Cochrane, afterward Earl of Dundonald, who was confidentially entrusted with the secret expedition for the conquest of Louisiana.  The last hope for England to wrest the control of the Mississippi River and the province of Louisiana from France had been foiled by Napoleon, who saw no use for it and ceded it to the United States in 1803. Upon the declaration of war by the United States in 1812, once again England's eyes were upon the coveted possession.  However, the crippled vessel of Lloyd's squadron was delayed over ten days for repairs and in burying their dead.  When Lloyd finally arrived in Jamaica, Admiral Cochrane was furious at Lloyd's disaster.  Too, the fleet did not arrive off Lake Bosque until four days after the arrival of General Jackson with his forces, which barely gave him time to make a defense.  Had Capt. Reid surrendered his vessel to the British, Louisiana might today be under the flag of St. George!
Captain Reid was accredited with the victory, thus saving a domain more than three times larger than the territory of France. Also, it should be remembered that Reid designed the American flag, as adopted by Congress in 1813.

Source: The Atlanta Journal 28 February 1887.

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Genealogy. A Whole Room was Stolen! #kentuckypioneers


A Whole Room was Stolen

amberroomThere remains treasure to be discovered! From sunken vessels under the sea to caves and underground caverns, lots of people left this world without their wealth! How much will a thief make off with? Consider the Amber Room. The Amber Room was first created in 1701 as part of the Charottenburg Palace in Berlin, Prussia where it remained until 1716 when it was given by the Prussian King Frederick William I to his all, Tar Peter the Great of Russia. Once it arrived in Russia, the room was expanded and over more than 55 square metres (590 sq ft). During the 18th century, the Amber Room in the Catherine Palace of Tsarskoye Selo near Saint Petersburg in Russia was decorated in amber panels backed with gold leaf and mirrors. It signified the wealth of the empire and was so valuable that during World War II it was dismantled , only to disappear afterwards. Before its loss, it was considered the "Eighth Wonder of the World." 
Ancestors in Daviess Co. KY


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Saturday, April 21, 2018

Constructing the "Deliverance" and the "Patience" #virginiapioneersnet #vagenealogy



Constructing the "Deliverance" and the "Patience"

Point ComportWhile waiting for help from Virginia, Sir George Somers and Sir Thomas Gates decided to build a pinnace. The charge was given to Richard Frobisher, an experienced shipwright. The only wood on the island that could be used for timber was cedar and that was too brittle for making good planks. Thus, the beams of the pinnace beams were constructed of oak from the wrecked ship, as were some planks in her bow, with all the rest being cedar. It too six months for the 40-foot keel was complete. Old cables that had been preserved furnished the oakum. One barrel of pitch and another of tar had been saved. Lime was made by mixing shells and a hard white stone and burning it a kiln, then slaked with fresh water and tempered with tortoise oil. Three months later the pinnace was launched, unrigged, and towed to a little island having easier access to the sea, the channel being deep enough to float her when masts, sails and all her trim had been placed on her. When the vessel was launched successfully, the governed named her The Deliverance". Late in November, and still with no word from Virginia, Sir George Somers became convinced that the pinnace which Frobisher was building would not be sufficient to transport all the men, women, and children from Bermuda to Virginia. He consulted with Sir Thomas Gates, the Governor, who approved his plan of building another pinnace which would require two carpenters and twenty men to work under Frobisher. The keel laid was twenty-nine feet in length, the beam fifteen feet and a half; she was eight feet deep and drew six feet of water, and was of thirty tons capacity. Sir George Somers launched her on the last day of April and brought her from the building bay in the main island into the channel where the "Deliverance" was moored. After nine months working on the ships, the men whose stout determination it was to finish the voyage they had begun nine months earlier, set sail in the two pinnaces on May 10, 1610, and after eleven days, arrived at Point Comfort. Names of Elizabeth City County Virginia Ancestors

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