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Monday, August 21, 2017

New! Newspaper Records of Giles County VA added to #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Giles County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Deeds, Marriages, Births, Deaths, Newspapers



Giles County

Giles County was established in 1806 from Montgomery, Monroe, Wythe, and Tazewell counties. The county seat is Pearisburg. The county was named for William Branch Giles, a member of the United States House of Representatives 1790 to 1815 and Virginia General Assembly from 1816 to 1822; later elected Governor in 1827. Giles County is included in the Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Radford, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Images of Wills, Estates, Deeds, Bonds, Guardianships, Births, Deaths and Marriages available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Wills, Estates, Deeds, Bonds, Guardianships 1805 to 1829
  • Wills, Estates, Deeds, Bonds, Guardianships 1829 to 1847
Vital Records
  • Births 1855 to 1896
  • Deaths 1855 to 1896
  • Marriages 1813 to 1859; 1871 to 1913
The Peurisburg Virginian (Newspaper Issues)
  • 1880 to 1912
Images of Giles County Wills, Estates, Inventories, Bonds, Deeds 1806 to 1829

Testators: Berden, Thomas | Biggs, John | Blake, James | Blake, John | Blankenship, John | Blankenship, Shadrake | Boyle, William | Bruce, William | Burk, Josiah | Burke, Thomas | Caldwell, Jacob | Chapman, George | Chapman, J. | Chapman, John | Clay (deed) Clay, Henry to Andrew Johnston | Clay, Mitchel Sr. | Cobun, Jeremiah Commack, John | Cooper, Jacoma | Copman (deed) | Corder, William, constable | Cormack, John | Darley, Hannah Dinger, Peter | Dunbar, Ephraim | Duncan to Duncan (deed) | Eagleson, William | Earickson, Matthew | Ebling, Paul | Echols, John | Eckholds, John | Farley, Judith Ferries, Robert | Fletcher, John | French, Matthew | French, Reuben | French, William | Grayham, Daniel | Gresham, Daniel | Guthrie, William | Hale, Edward | Hale, John | Hale, Vincent Harman, Henry | Harman, William | Harrison, John | Harrison, William | Heathington, Christopher | Hughs, George | Hunter, Mary to Andrew Crawford (deed) | Hunter, Peter | Hunter, Robert | Huson, Thomas | Hutchison, Robert | Johnson, John | Johnston, James | Karr, James | Kiffer, Jacob | Kipinger, John | Kirk, William | Larkin, John | Lucas, Charles | Lucas, David | Lucas, Edward | Lucas, Ralph | Lucas, William | Lybrook, George | Martin, Daniel | Maxey, Eli | Maxey, Elizabeth | McDonald, Lewis | McKinsey, Mordecai| Mollitt, Noah | Napier, P., bond for Constable | Patton, Thomas | Pearce, George | Peek, Benjamin | Peek, John | Perdue, James | Peters, John | Peters, Philip to William Smith (deed) | Pines, William | Price, Henry | Prince, William | Proutt, Henry | Rose, Obadiah | Sartain, John | Scholds, John | Shorter, James | Shrewsberry, Jeremiah | Smith, Henry to Jacob Peek (deed)| Smith, Sampson | Smith, William, Captain, agreement | Snodgrass, John | Solesbury, A. | Stafford, James | Stafford, John | Stinson, Jacob | Stuart, Alexander Stuart (deed) | Stuart, John to Lewis Stuart (deed) | Taylor, Adam | Thompson, James | Varst, Christian Watts, William to Jacob Peek (deed) | Webb, John | White, James | Williams, Andrew Williams, George | Williams, Jeremiah | Williams, Michael | Williams, Philip | Wilson, William 

Giles County Wills, Estates, Inventories, Bonds, Deeds 1829 to 1847

Testators: Albert, George | Allen, Thomas | Anderson, Joseph | Atkins, Moses | Bailey, Micajah | Barker, William | Camp to Finch (deed) | Brown, William | Caldwell, Joshua | Carr, John | Chapman, George | Chapman, Isaac | Chapman, John | Crawford, James | Dane, James | Darr, Joseph | Dingess, Charles | Dunbar, Ephraim | Epling, Paul | Epling, Philip Farley, Thomas | Fillinger, Jacob | Flick, Michael | Ford, Edmund | French, David | French, James | Frith, Mary | Fry, David | Givins, Isaiah | Hale, Martha | Hale, Vinson | Hall, David | Harless, Michael | Harman, Henry | Henderson, John | Huffin, John | Hull, Henry | Hunter, Robert | Johnston, Adam | Johnson, David, Captain | Johnson, David to Andrew Johnston (deed) | Johnston, David | Johnston, Samuel | Johnston, Thomas | Johnston, William | Karr, John | Kirk, Martha | Lafann, John | Lang, Mary | Link, Gasper | Lowrey, John | Lucas, Parker | Lybeck, John | Lybrook, John | McClaugherty, John | McDaniel, Thomas | More, Francis | Mustard, James | Neel, William | Patterson, Agnes | Pearis, George | Peek, Jacob | Peters, John | Price, George | Reed, John | Rees, John | Reynolds, John | Shannon, Thomas | Snider, Christian | Snider, Jacob | Snider, John | Stafford, James | Stedley, Jacob | Swaley, James | Tawney, Daniel | Trout, Nancy | Vass, Leland | Waddle, James | Webb, Anna | Webb, Julius | Williams, George | Williams, Margaret | Young, Robert 

Images of Wills, Estates, Deeds, Bonds, Guardianships
  • 1806 to 1829
  • 1829 to 1847

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Sunday, August 20, 2017

Prince Charles will NOT be Charles II #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet


No, Prince Charles will not be Charles II: Rather Charles III 

Charles ICharles ICharles IICharles IICharles III, Prince of WalesCharles III, Prince of Wales


Charles I of England ruled during the early formation of the American colonies. He was born in Fife on 19 November 1600, the second son of James VI of Scotland (and James I of England) and Anne of Denmark and became heir to the throne of England upon the death of his brother, Prince Henry in 1612. His 1625 succession was as the second Stuart King of Great Britain. Because of the controversy during his reign and the time that Jamestown colonists were sending their first Burgesses to London to settle matters of tobacco tax, the king was not convening Parliament. However, as he engaged in wars with France and Spain and sent the Duke of Buckingham to France to gain political influence and military power, the intense dislike for this duke brought about his impeachment in 1628. Charles was compelled to recall Parliament during April of 1640 to request funds for war against the Scots, and again in November. During the reign of Charles I, the colonies suffered a massacre near Jamestown (1622/3) which killed most of the white population. 

Charles II assumed the throne of England in 1630 after the execution of his father (Charles I) at Whitehall on 30 January 1649. Although the Parliament of Scotland proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the "English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth," and the country was a de facto republic led by Oliver Cromwell. In 1651, Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Thus, Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland while Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands. Upon the death of Cromwell in 1658, a political crisis ensued which resulted in the restoration of the monarchy, and Charles was invited to return to Britain. On 29 May 1660, his 30th birthday, he was received in London to public acclaim. After the year of 1660, all legal documents were dated as though he had succeeded his father as king in 1649. Ultimately, his reign was successful and he was a popular and beloved King. Virginians fared better under Charles II, despite English traderegulations and taxes imposed upon the colonists. 

Thus, Prince Charles of Wales will assume the title of Charles III after the death of Queen Elizabeth. 

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock, Virginia #genealogy #virginiapioneers

Hoskins Creek in Tappahannock

Hoskins CreekTappahannock, the county seat, is the oldest town in Essex County, Virginia and is situated on the Rappahannock River. An interestint aspect of tracing ancestors is to locate and visit the actual site of old homes and beginnings. As we study the deed records, we can just about pinpoint the old home sites. This is important because it provides a grasp of the history of the area and the people who settled there. Reading the old wills and inventories of the county discloses facits of a shared farm economy which helped to feed the earliest settlers, as well as details of everyday living and possessions.   

New Additions: Essex County Wills 1695[1730

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Friday, August 18, 2017

Both Legs Mashed Off #genealogy #georgiapioneers

Both Legs Mashed Off! 

"About dark this evening, Sam Weller, the yard engineer of the Western and Atlantic railroad, ran over Dr. John S. Wilson, a real estate agent of this city, and mashed off his legs just below the knees. The accident occurred at the Whitehall street crossing, and Dr. Wilson was in the act of crossing the track when the engine struck him. Tonight his condition is regarded critical. Dr. Wilson came to Atlanta from Augusta many years ago and for some time was a member of the drug firm of Pemberton, Willson, Taylor & Co." Source: The Headlight, published Gray, Georgia, August 11, 1888.

New Additions:
Georgia: Fulton County Pensions Records added to Georgia Pioneers
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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Earliest Settlers to Essex County #genealogy #virginiapioneersnet

Names of Earliest Settlers on this Map 

Map of First Plantations in Essex CountyThis map depicts the locations of the first settlers to Essex County, viz: Dangerfield, Layton, Payne, Garnet, Smith, Lowry, Young, Hill and Bowler. Tappahannock was a large community of these settlers. Henry Aubrey established his plantation on Hodgkins Creek (later Hoskins Creek) where he raised hogs, cattle and sheep. Upon his death in 1694, he left much of the cattle to servants, and 700 acres to his son, Richard Aubrey on Hodgkins Creek. He lived the typical life of a planter in Essex County, of feather beds, fine linen and a silver tankard which he bequeathed to his wife. Also, there were orchard buildings to accommodate fruit crops. 

The images of the earliest wills are available to members of Virginia Pioneers Also, the Wills and Estates probated from 1692 to 1695 were the following first settlers: Henry Awbrey, Elizabeth Browne, Thomas Cooper, Richard Holt, Martin Johnson, John Jones, Thomas Pettit, Griffin Roberts, John Smith, John Waters and Thomas Williamson. More Wills and Estates were recently added dating from 1717 to 1721; 1722 to 1730. 

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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Sussex County Images added to #virginiapioneersnet - 1754 to 1785 - Click on Link to "See the Names"

Waverly Plantation

New! Images of Sussex County Wills, Estates, Guardianships, Inventories dating from 1754 to 1785 added to #virginiapioneersnet  See Names


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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Smith's Fort in America. #virginiapioneersnet


Smith's Fort

Smith's FortHistorical Tidbits: Capt. John Smith's fort in Surry County, Virginia; also called the Rolfe-Warren House. The fort no longer exists. This area was selected for the site of a town. As an inducement to build, settlers were granted in fee simple a half-acre lot. In 1652, Surry County was formed from a portion of James City County in the Royal Colony of Virginia south of the James River. In 1676, a local Jacobean brick house was occupied as a fort or castle during Bacon's famous Rebellion against the Royal Governor, Sir William Berkeley. Want to receive more historical tidbits on Virginians? Join our free blog 

Surry County Virginia Genealogy Records
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