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Friday, February 24, 2017

James I Opposed the Growing of Tobacco in Virginia #virginiapioneersnet

King James Opposed the Growing of Tobacco

King James opposed the growing of tobacco in the colonies, saying that it was evil, and did everything in his power to discourage planting. Instead, His Majesty addressed the London Company sharply reproving it for not growing mulberry trees for the cultivation of silk. In 1623, a letter was prepared for the colony by the privy council of the king and addressed to Sir Francis Wyatt, Knight and Captain-General of Virginia, wherein the colony was admonished to pay more attention to staple commodities, especially to that of iron, vines and silk. Then, a year later, King James prohibited the importation of foreign tobacco as well as the planting of tobacco in England and Ireland while allowing it to be planted in Virginia and on the Somer Isle because those colonies were "yet in their infancy." After the death of the king in 1625, he was succeeded by his son, Charles I. Upon descending the throne Charles I manifested the same hostile attitude towards the plant and prohibited the importation of tobacco except that grown in the colony. He not only continued its sale, however, created a monopoly for the crown, allowing planters to pay "for the privilege". The London Company proceeded to raise 200,000 pounds, but the matter fell into dispute and King Charles thought it best to establish a royal government. Accordingly, he dissolved the Company in 1626.  James City Co. VA Genealogical Resources and Historical Articles

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