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Sunday, February 19, 2017

Where the Cherokees Went #northcarolinapioneers

The Exiled Cherokees in Qualla Town

Qualla Indian ReserveThe Qualla Boundary is a territory held as a land trust for the federally recognized Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians who reside in western North Carolina. The Trust provides that the land was purchased by the tribe during the 1870s and placed under Federal protection. Individuals can buy, own, and sell the land, provided they are enrolled members of the Tribe of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. They are the Cherokees driven into exile. Before the Treaty of 1830 which removed the Cherokees from the East and Qualla Town became an Indian Reserve consisting of 72,000 acres of land in Haywood County which is occupied by about 800 Cherokee Indians and 100 Catawbas. According to Letters from the Alleghany Mountains by Charles Lanman (1849), the Cherokees mostly resided in the mountains which are watered by beautiful streams, and the valleys and slopes are quite fertile. The lower mountains are well adapted for grazing and plentiful game. According to Lanman, the Cherokees elected an old friend, WIlliam H. Thomas, as their business chief and the Indian Nation had divided into seven clans. The names are: In-e-chees-quah or Bird Clan; In-egil-lohee or Pretty Face Clan; In-e-wo-tah or Paint Clan' In-e-wah-he-yah or Wolf Clan; In-e-se-ho-nih or Blue Clan; In-e-co-wih or Deer Clan; and In-e-eo-te-ca-wih. The customs among those clans prevented their marrying among themselves, and such practices were punished by death. More than three-fourths of the population could read in their own language while the majority understood English. 
Haywood Co. NC Genealogy Resources and Historical Stories

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