NfHk5934WxEwpTHIi8FD83b1XONzH9XA sF0XrkJUcSgyQpyUPbMTboXgYy9H GENEALOGY HISTORY

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Friday, May 25, 2018

Indian Legends which "Live On"

Indian Legends which "Live On"

Young Deer Burial
Grave of Young Deer
However, there are some legends which live on, such as " Youngdeer " of Forsyth County. John Tidwell is believed to have been a full-blooded Cherokee who resided in North Georgia, around Paulding County. He was married to a white woman, Winnafred (Winnie) Tidwell. Their union produced a son, Indian John Tidwell. He died near Allatoona in Bartow County, Georgia after being shot by an unknown killer. The stone contains the prayer - " Let me walk in beauty and make my eyes behold the red and purple sunset". Many descendants of John Tidwell applied for money from the U. S. Court of Claims (1906-1910), claiming that John Tidwell was a Cherokee Indian, the son of Youngdeer, and that he went west ca 1835 to the reservation in Arkansas, but later returned to Georgia. All of their applications were rejected because of inconsistencies. 

Native American Records are available to members of Georgia Pioneers

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The Peruke #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

The Peruke

perukeAre our memories of the past real or have we just made some adjustments in what we'd prefer to remember? Of course we do not remember the age in which we did not live. Yet, we are familiar with horse buggys, Model-T's and the old-fashioned barbershop on the corner. How is that? There are prompters in our midst, such as monuments of heroes and wars and other events which happened before we were born. Historical homes on display to the public contain remnants of the furniture and personal items of its former occupants, and include oil paintings on the walls of the colonial dress and wigs. Just about every political figure of the past is wearing a white peruke. The wearing of wigs as a fashion was more than that. It was a social necessity. Those were the days of lice, when frequent bathing was considered unhealthy. If that is odd, consider the 1960s when the proper fashions of the day were discarded for baggy pants, unruly hair and tattoos. My generation went from going to school and to a job wearing a dress, coat, hat and gloves to dressing like bums. And, what about the constant chiding of the so-called experts of today concerning the foods which we consume? The judgment is passed upon coffee and cola drinks, automobile emissions, and on and on, even to the point of creating laws against such items in some cities. The average colonial who viewed frequent bathing as being unhealthy pales in acerbity compared to the self-professed experts of today. The plantation gentlemen who arose early every morning and rode his horse into the fields to view his crops, wore a turban. Also acceptable was powdered hair. Soldiers received 20 pounds of powder per year. It absorbed the natural oils of the hair. Today that same old talcum is marketed as dry shampoo. There were issues which resulted from not washing daily, like body odors and lice in the hair. During the first half of the 20th century, ringworm was active in the hair of school children.
See Names of Washington Co. Virginia Ancestors

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The Odd Naming of Children

The Odd Naming of Children

Sir Francis DrakeThere is a Sir Francis Drake last will and testament in Logan County dated 1814. He was born in Cumberland, Virginia and appear to be descended from the famous Sir Francis Drake of England. Probably this sort of naming with the first name as "Sir Francis" to a child is a reminder to the heirs of descent from a prominent figure in time. Even the less obvious names seem to have great meaning within the family structure. I recently analyzed the naming of every child in a certain family. Some were given surnames as the first name. The experience was eye-opening once I examined the families in the same county with those surnames. Eventually, I was able to discover the name of the grandmother who never married, but had seven children by the same father. Tracing that particular lineage took me to a Revolutionary War Soldier from Abbeville, South Carolina to Henry County, Georgia. Once I prepared his family group sheet listing all of the children, the identity of the unmarried daughter (who had the illegitimate children) became apparent. Names of Logan Co. KY Ancestors


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Bedford County Genealogy, Wills, Estates, Marriages


Bedford County Court HouseBedford County was created from Lunenberg County in December 13, 1753; parts of Albemarle County were added in 1754, and an additional part of Lunenberg County was added even later. In 1782, Campbell County was formed for parts of Bedford County; in 1786, Franklin County was formed from Bedford County.

Bedford County Probate Records available to members of Virginia Pioneers

Tax Digests
  • Bedford County Tax Digests of 1782, 1784 to 1816
Digital Images of Wills 1763 to 1787

Testators: Allen, Reynolds | Allen, Robert | Allford, Silvator | Banister, William | Bates, John | Beard, Adam | Beard, Elizabeth | Beard, John | Birdwell, George | Board, John Sr. | Bodiker, William | Bowyer, Frederick | Bramlett, William | Brander, John | Brown, John | Bryan, William | Buford, Thomas | Burgess, William| Bush, John | Callaway, George | Campbell, William | Candler, Daniel | Cantrell, Sarah | Carson, John | Cook, Andris | Credell, Humphrey | Dalton, Timothy| Dixon, Thomas| Dooly, Thomas| Downing, John | Early, Jeremiah | Eger, George | English, Stephen | Ewing, Charles | Ewing, Robert | Ferguson, John | Fuqua, Ralph | Gaddey, George | Gibson, James | Gilbert, Samuel | Goad, John | Goode, John | Gouldman, Edward | Gower, Standly | Gray, John | Green, John | Greer, Joseph | Hailes, Francis | Hail, Richard | Hamilton, Thomas | Hancock, George | Hardwick, Robert | Hatcher, Edward | Hayth, William | Haynes, William | Hoard, William | Hollogain, John | Huddleston, Abraham | Hunter, Alexander | Irvine, Christopher | Irvine, William | Itheny, Thomas | Johnson, Benjamin | Jones, Michael | Jones, William | Kennedy, John | Lawson, Jonas | Lainhart, John Christopher | Linn, Adam| Loving, William | Martin, Robert | McCormack, William | Milam, Benjamin | Milam, Thomas| Miller, Simon | Mitchell, Daniel | Moon, Jacob Jr. | Moorman, Silas | Moreman, Thomas | Morgan, Thomas | Morris, Daniel | Murphy, Thomas | McMurtree, James | Pate, Edward | Pate, John | Phelps, John | Pollard, Francis | Prather, Jonathan | Rawlins, Benjamin | Ray, Joseph | Redd, John | Rentfroe, Joseph | Roberts, David | Roberts, Thomas | Robinson, James | Roland, Henry | Rust, George | Shaw, John | Smelser, 
... see more names ...

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Thursday, May 24, 2018

Discoveries of Persons in Old Photos Might Occur in Dreams

Discoveries of Persons in Old Photos Might Occur in Dreams

1941 FordMost genealogists have worked for years and years upon their family tree. It is no easy task and requires dedicated attention. Also, our memories of the past are part of the engine which assists in discovering the hidden information concerning our ancestors. Most people do not recall their childhood memories. Perhaps a friend or two. But it seems as though the childhood is a hidden era of our existence so far as recall is concerned. 
Forgotten memories sometimes appear in dreams while we sleep or emerge suddenly. It happened to me while looking at old b&w photos of some familiar people. The setting was early 1900s on an old farm. 

Judging by the costumes, my best guess was 1930 or 1940. (Now, if they had an old car or buggy, that would have told me the year). Although the faces were vaguely familiar, their surroundings were not. I knew that my father's people were from the country, but I suspected these persons were on my mother's side of the family. Is there a process for identifying old photos? I do not know, other than the use of common sense. 

Meanwhile, I stashed that photo inside my head somewhere with the caution to "remember." And it happened. One morning I awoke with the name of my great-grandmother upon my lips. Of course! I was almost eight years of age when she died and this memory found its way to the present! That confirms that our memories are all stashed somewhere waiting for us.

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Old Auto Classics are Displayed in Downtown St. Augustine Florida


This old classic is parked in St. Augustine Florida.  It displays a certain elegance of the past.  Walking around downtown is a real treat, as there are so many collectors who display their autos. 

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Ask "why?" #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

Ask "why?"

1886 buggyrideGenealogy research is a rolling vehicle searching for facts. Because it is items such as birth, death and marriage dates which drive the integrity of the search. Another essential element to the vehicle is a clear understanding of how wars and other events were affected communities and everyday family life. Here is a good example. During the Revolutionary War, soldiers only signed up for three month periods. Now, let us ask "why?" Well, here we go. The British soldiers had landed in the port cities and were engaging at every opportunity. Frequently, it was the militia companies which assembled on a moment's notice to engage the British. The Continental Army consisted of those who enlisted for three month terms so that they could return home during planting and harvesting. Sometimes, they sent a servant or friend in their place for the three months, themselves enlisting later. These short terms added up and by 1780, most rebels had served at least one year. The longer the term, the more acreage was involved in the land grant. Applications for pensions were replete with stories of their adventures, including the names of officers and battles. Many histories are available online of the officers who served in the Revolutionary War. That information also provides a historical accounting of battles in which our ancestors participated. Likewise, one can read the pensions of Civil War Soldiers which are usually found in the State and County of enlistment. The names of officers may seem like minor details, however, they go a long way in describing the struggles of the war. A perusal of the civil war pensions for the Confederate States reveal the sad results of devastation of crops, burning of homes, and a distinct poverty within the conquered South which was still in play in 1903 when most pensions were issued. Thus, pension records are one source to learn "why." And understand. 

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Names of SC Ancestors --- > Edgefield County


Edgefield County Wills, Estates, Deeds

1890 EdgefieldThe county was formed in 1785 as part of Ninety Six District; parts of Edgefield later went to form Aiken (1871), Saluda (1895), Greenwood (1897), and McCormick (1916) counties. The county seat is the town of Edgefield. The northern part of the Ninety Six was previously inhabited by Cherokee Indians. The southern part adjoined the Savannah River and was used as hunting grounds by the Creeks, Savannahs and other tribes. Edgefield country was trafficked by white men who created a lucrative trade with the Indians for their buffalo and beaver skins and who exported as many as two hundred and fifty thousand skins a year from the state. It was not until 1748 that permanent settlements were made along the Savannah River. Families trickled in from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Germany, Holland and France as well as from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. Others, forbidden to deal in slavery, fled from Georgia to make their plantations along the Savannah River. The first Scotch families settled on the Saluda side of Edgefield south of Chappells Ferry. The site was located near a hill where large chestnut trees grew. Later, the Baptist Church of Chestnut Hill was later organized and built. They called the settlement Scotland. Among the first Scots was Joseph Culbreath, born near Plymouth Scotland in 1747, who was brought to Edgefield by his father, Edward Culbreath in 1756. The father died a year later, leaving his sons, Joseph, John, Daniel and Edward. The sons all lived to be over the ages of 70. The family of Harry Hazel came with the Culbreaths to the new country. In 1770 a ferry was established over the Saluda River on the land of Robert Cunningham and another one over the Savannah River, opposite to Augusta in Georgia. Edgefield was the site of several Revolutionary War skirmishes and was defended by those who had settled from North Carolina and Virginia. One such family was that of William Abney who had settled about a mile or so from Scotland in 1772. Nathaniel Abney served as a captain of a militia company under Major Andrew Williamson at Ninety Six. Opposing the patriots was the Stewart family whose homestead was located on Tosty Creek on the Saluda. 

Early settlers: Peter Finson, Francis W. Pickens, Benjamin Tilman, General Martin Witherspoon Cary, Allen Bailey, Nathan Melton, William Daniel, William Tobler, Spencer Hawes, George Miller, Jeremiah Lamar, Robert Gardner, David Pitts, Arthur Watson, Nathaniel Abney, Jesse Griffin, George Bender, Michael Burkhalter, Thomas Spraggins, Mathew Devore, Allen Burton, George Kyser, Nathaniel Bacon, Wright Nicholson, Joseph McGinnis, John Oliphant, John Blalock, Benjamin Buzbie, Robert Jennings, Jessy Rountree, Amos Richardson, Hezekiah Gentry, Benjamin Hightower, Thomas turk, Stephen Garrett and others.
...more...

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Wednesday, May 23, 2018

How the Scottish Highlanders Won the War of Jenkin's Ear #georgiapioneers


McIntosh County was Settled by Highlanders

Prince CharlesDuring 1733 General James Oglethorpe transported over one hundred settlers from the highlands of Scotland. The Scots had suffered persecution in the hands of the British since their first hero, Charles Stuart sought the throne in 1689. And during the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, history a young prince known affectionately as "bonnie Prince Charles" came on the scene and attempted to claim the throne for himself. Charles Edward Stuart believed that it was his birthright and he planned an invasion of Great Britain with his Jacobite following and removed the Hanoverian usurper, George II. When the plan failed, the Scottish clans first began to immigrate. By 1733, however, with poorly circumstances influencing the highlanders, they opted to depart. Oglethorpe set aside the location of an old British fort in America, between Savannah and Darien, to protect the new colonists in Savannah from the Spanish armada in St. Augustine. If the truth be told, it was the highlanders who, using guerrilla warfare against an attack of Spanish conquistadors during the War of Jenkins Ear (1742) which convinced Spain to surrender and relinquish its claim to land in the Americas.  Ancestors in McIntosh County GA

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Are your Connections "Problematic?"

Are your Connections "Problematic?"

1918 dressDo you know the name of a wife on a family group sheet whom you believe to be a family connection? Does logic point that way, but nothing can be proven? However, if you add it to the family tree (and it is wrong), then countless hours (even years) have been wasted upon tracing the continuation of that lineage. That supposition is probably the focus of many genealogies. I recently reviewed Family Search and discovered that someone had connected to my lineage at the point where I thought the name of the wife was justified. 

However, the continuation of the husband's lineage was nothing like I had proven through the records. The answer to accepting an unproven name is resoundingly "No!" 

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