cookieChoices = {};'

Friday, September 22, 2017

The Children of Pride #genealogy #familyhistory #georgiapioneers

The Children of Pride 

The Children of PrideThe history which is taught in school has little to do with the actual past. Southerners were always depicted as illiterate farmers, because they grew the crops and shipped it to northern factories. However, there is over-whelming evidence that they were instead well-read, articulate ladies and gentlemen whose education far excels that of today. A "person of letters" aptly describes the proper use of verbs, nouns and pronouns, and the phraseology contained in old dairies and war letters reflects that quality families resided in remote places out in the country. The Children of Pride by Robert Manson Myers is a collection of letters written by the Jones families during the Civil War. The Jones resided on a plantation in South Georgia, in the isolated community of Midway, Georgia. Some 1200 letters were written, packed with vocabulary, style and the beauteous cursive writing. Although in a back-woods setting, the Jones family carefully reflected upon their correspondence, taking time to "keep up with their letters", as the expression goes, meaning that writing letters helped to retain grammar, vocabularity and educational skills. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:


genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Archaeologists Dig for Ansers. Shouldn't Genealogists Do the Same? #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Archaeologists Dig for Answers. Shouldn't Genealogists Do the Same?

old farmHow often have you passed old corn fields and apple orchards on the road? An old torn-down barn, red bricks scattered in the yard, the remains of a few budding jonquils and daylilies? Did you have the impression of an unpleasant existence? If you found where the out-house stood, you might notice that old bottles and trash were dumped in that hole. And the well might house a few relics of the past lives of our ancestors. Ironically, archaelogists do not see open space as a depressing wilderness. In fact, they are prepared to dig deep into the soil to find more evidence of past generations. The key is to locate the old home site of the ancestors, then examine everything, including the markings of tractor tires. Every grave in this country has not been located. In fact, there are many graves around old farms which can be discovered by noticing humps in the soil and broken slate tombstones buried under weeds. Nearby woods, full of briars and scrub trees and bushes, were once cleared and planted. When you walk across a deserted field, do you ever think that graves may lie under your feet? Or that the rutted terrain could be an old road? How about the dried up pond? Is that a good place to search for relics? Just as treasures are hid under the ground, information is hidden in old documents found at court houses. Plats, deeds, wills, estates, tax digests, etc. Most genealogists do not see their ancestors at first glance. That is because they were searching for one name only. However, a visit to the family cemetery will reveal relatives and friends, and husbands of the daughters. It is advisable to become familiar with these names and recognized them in other documents. I have searched for one particular family for more than 40 years. However, not until I sat down and read every last will and testament written in that county (for a specified era) as well as the estate sales, old deeds and tax digests, did I realize that it was all there in the subtle inference of family members. A familiarity with the people in the neighborhood is invaluable in realizing that some of them were kin and piecing together the puzzle. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:


genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Identifying Neighbors for Genealogy #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

Identifying Neighbors

tax digestThe tax digest is a solid means of identifying the neighbors of ancestors. Each district has a representative (usually a captain) who lists the names and acreage in his neighborhood. And it is certainly worth the effort to make a copy of this neighborhood, because these people will confirm that you have the correct ancestor. Example. Suppose that your ancestor was one of the John Smith's in the county. A search of the deeds, wills, estates and marriages could easily create a disaster. That is why the names of the neighbors are so important. They witnessed documents, deeded properties, and married daughters and sons. A deed for John Smith which contains some of the names from your ancestor's district will help clarify that you have the correct John Smith. Common names were frequently used in the old days and it is easy to get confused. Now, suppose there is a daughter who married a John Smith. It is very important to ascertain his exact birth and death dates, and the local church graveyard is a good source for this. One must be exacting in the details, because confusion is always nearby! 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:

genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Complicated Kinships #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Complicated Kinships

colonial childrenFor years I searched to locate the parents of an certain ancestor. However, not until I had tediously read all of last wills and testaments and estate records of the county where he resided, did I realize that I possessed the answer in my hand in the form of a last will and testament of a man who died in that county before the birth of his son. And that the wife remarried and when she gave birth, naming the child after his deceased father, Harrison Acworth. Acworth was the surname of the step-father. I was previously perplexed by this naming, as it did not fit the other Acworth children. Yet, the generation was equal. So now, instead of Harrison being the father of my ancestor, he was the half-brother! Thus, identifying the mother in this manner without the record of her (second) marriage, clarified the situation. During the 17th and 18th centuries, after the death of a spouse, a remarriage was eminent. In fact, no sooner than a widow buried her husband, than suitors commenced calling. That is because times of the importance of maintaining the family home and raising the children. Many marriages went unrecorded at the court house because it was not required. That is why the details existing in the community must be seriously dwelt upon by the researcher. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:


genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Fayette County KY Sons of the Military #genealogy #kentuckypioneers

Fayette County Sons of the Military

Map of Indian TribesWilliam Russell, born in 1758, the son of General William and Tabitha Russell of Culpeper County, Virginia. In 1774 he joined one of the expeditions of Daniel Boone into Powell Valley against the Shawnee Indians. At the onset of the Revolutionary War, he served as an aide to Colonel William Campbell and fought at Kings Mountain, Whitsell Mills and Guilford Court House. After the war, he removed to Fayette County, Kentucky and settled on land which his father had received for military service. He participated in several expeditions under Generals James Wilkinson, Charles Scott and Anthony Wayne during 1791 and 1794 along the Wabash and Maumee Rivers in the Northwest Territory. Russell served in the Virginia Legislature and House until about 1823. In 1808, President James Madison appointed Russell as Colonel of the 7th Infantry Regiment in the regular army and fought in the Battle of Tippecanoe against the Shawnee. In 1812 he was appointed to the supreme command of the Army of the Northw3est, commanding the frontiers of Indiana, Illinois and Missouri. Afterwards, retired to his farm in Fayette County. Source: Kentucky Encyclopedia by John E. Kleber. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:


genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Monday, September 18, 2017

Irishmen Beheaded by Tories #genealogy #history #georgiapioneers

Irishman Beheaded by Tories

British SoldiersWilliam Barron Sr. was born in Ireland and emigrated to the American colonies, and settled in Warren County, Georgia. However, British soldiers were not known to be nice. Especially, when during the Revolutionary War, a group of Tories beheaded Barron and putting his head on a pole, paraded it around Augusta for three weeks. It occurred during the battle of Augusta in September of 1780. While he was lying wounded on the battlefield during a flag of truce while the dead were being removed for burial. A Tory by the name of Grayson found him and removed him to an old plaza and as soon as the Tories learned that it was Captain Barron, a large sum of money was offered for his head. An Indian did the deed. There were many horrors which occurred at the hands of british soldiers by citizens and rebels as well. The only way to learn about the hardships enduring during those years of fighting for freedom is to read old pension records of Revolutionary War soldiers. It is quite interesting to read their own words, as they describe the battles and events of the war. One begins to truly appreciate the price which our ancestors paid for the American Constitution. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:


genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Chowanoac Indians #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

The Chowanoac Indians

ChowanoacindiansWhen the Europeans were settling the colonies during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the Chowanoac Indians occupied both banks of the Chowan River in Northeastern North Carolina. They spoke the Algonquian language which is said to mean " people at the south." Their villages and lands covered Gates, Hertford, Bertie and Chowan Counties. Their neighbors were the Iroquoian Mongoak (later Tuscarora) to the south and west of Salmon Creek in Bertie County, the Algonquian Weapemeoc were neighbors east of Rockyhock Creek in Chowan County. When Sir Walter Raleigh was colonizing from 1584 to 1590, the Chowanoac were probably the most powerful of the Carolina Algonquians. The Chowanoac took offense to English encroachment during 1666 when and violence broke out upon the settlers occupying the western side of the Chowan River. Eventually, however, as the English continued their settlements, the Chowanoac abandoned their lands more

Images of Caswell County NC Wills and Estates: 1783 to 1800
genealogy real estate
Get more Genealogy Real Estate for your Effort
. Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites and Get More Data