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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Can you Fix this Genealogy Clock? #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

The Genealogy Clock

genealogy clockThe time which one spends searching for the ancestors cannot be measured. That is because long before the body takes off on a field trip or searches records, the brain is forever working problems, ascertaining facts, recalling dates and places, and trying to discover answers. Searching for the ancestors is a blessed gift, because it teaches us to "remember." Anyone who researches a particular lineage does not have to continuously refer to notes. That is because the genealogy clock is always on duty, reminding. Reminding. How handy is it to visit the archives and while examining books and microfilm, recognize your people? As long as the dates are correct, we stay on track. Because it is so easy to get confused while we are tracing a generation of folks not within the scope of the correct time-frame. Because we remember the roads to the old ancestral homes, this sense of direction, combined with easy recall of dates and the frequent search for answers, spills over into brain power which perhaps avoids the rungs of dementia!

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Monday, October 16, 2017

Your Genealogy Work-Around? #northcarolinapioneers #genealogy

Your Genealogy Work-Around!

buckleSometimes all that we need is a few good ideas (or clues) as to where to search next. Many complaints evolve around undiscovered marriage records and estates (or wills). Yet there are "work arounds" for all genealogy issues. While one cannot always complete the puzzle, they can form the surrounding pieces. Picture an incomplete farm house, then search for the barns, roads, fences, wells, trees, flowers, etc. The farm house represents the family itself, while the surrounding areas complete the neighborhood structure with friends, relatives and community affairs. Actually, it is the neighborhood which is so revealing of the family tree. Local churches and graveyards identify the neighbors and in-laws that you could not find in the marriage records. Most States did not require marriages to be filed at the court house until after 1900. That means that those which do appear (before 1900) represent but a small sampling of what "lshould be." Small farms were building their homes upon virgin lands. The neighbors were few and far between. Who else would the daughters marry, unless they traveled some distance to visit other relatives? Clues do exist. The secret is familiarizing oneself with the surrounding puzzle pieces. This type of familiarity can begin by carefully reading all of the tombstones in the old section of church graveyards, even photographing them for later reference. The names which appear in the old section also appear on the deed records of that county. They are buying and selling land; and, importantly, witnessing deeds and other transactions of the ancestors. How much land did these guys own, and whose names were on the farms? The tax digest is also helpful because it helps to clarify adjoining properties, and whether or not one is a "junior" or "senior." When the father died, his farm lands were divided between the sons. Up until the time of his death, however, the tax digest list exact acreages. Later, after the property is divided, odd amounts of acreage were listed by the sons, and you can count off the acreage from the original plot. If the death occurred prior to the 1850 census before the names of children were recorded, this method is an alternative to locating other heirs. The old-timers did not always write a last will and testament. Instead, they divided their property between the children prior to death in the form of "Deeds of Gift." If the widow remarried, the deeds could turn up a Marriage Contract which provides even more details concerning the disposition of the estate, and, relationships. All estate records should be examined carefully. That is, wills, inventories, sales, annual returns, appraisements, guardianships, bonds and receipts. None of these items are in one place in the probate court. The reason is that such documents were written in the book of the clerk as they were filed of record. Thus, once the last will and testament is found, a scan of the next several probate books is indicated. During the examination of the estate records, it is also important to take note of the names of witnesses and purchasers of items from the estate sale. If you have a relic which was passed down through the families, the inventory is the place to search for its origin. As is pictured above, this buckle was found by relic hunters at an old home place in Hillsborough, North Carolina. If you find the old home place, perhaps it would be wise to dig. Just saying.

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Sunday, October 15, 2017

Why it is so Important to Search Deed Records for your Ancestors #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Why it is so Important to Search Deed Records for your Ancestors

working cartsThe deed records should not be ignored when researching ancestors. This includes land grants, plats and lotteries. Anyone who has drawn a modern-day deed heads the document with "John Smith of Goochland County, Virginia" The first land and bounty grants contain vague descriptions of the land. Thatis because the bounderies contained no neighbors or traditional measurements as we know them today. Instead, 18 chains to an oak tree adjoined by a pine forest is about the best that you can expect. Therefore, one goes in search of a deed record which mentions the names of neighbors, who received the original land grant and the date thereof, and designates gifts to children and other relatives. As time goes on and the community grows, the names of adjoining neighboring lands and witnesses appear in the documents. Also filed with the deeds are "Gift Deeds" and " Marriage Contracts". This is where the details provide further clues. One should follow the deed records from the first day of acquisition to the last deed, when the land is either sold or inherited. Then, a similar search should be done in the Tax Digests. The research should be able to recite the activities of the ancestor year-by-year. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:
Marriages
  • Bonds, 1730 to 1751
  • 1750 to 1854
Digital Images of Goochland County Wills 1741 to 1745 

Testators: Atkinson, Robert;Ballenger, Joseph; Bell, David ;Christian, Thomas;Cunningham, James; Dillon, William; Dupuy, Bartholomew; Ford, Peter; Harrar, William ;Holland, Michael; Holland, Michael the elder to Michael, Jr. (deed); Horros, William; Marton, Peter ;Mayo, William ;Meriwether, Nicholas ;Parrish, Humphrey Sr. ;Payne, George ;Purkins, Abram ; Randolph, William ;Sampson, Francis ;Spear, John ;Taylor, Charles; Trabue, Anthony

Digital Images of Goochland County Wills 1745 to 1749

Testators: Butler, Edmond; Carter, Edward; Clements, Stephen; Coleman, Samuel ;Cox, Sarah; Easly, John ;Hix, John ; Holland, Michael (deed); James, Francis ;Levillain, Jean ;Levillain, John ;Lockett, Thomas ;Mogginson, William ;Morgain, Robert ;Mosby, Richard ;Netherland, Sarah ;Phelps, John ; Randolph, William ;Turpin, Obedience ;Warron, Daniel 

Will Abstracts
  • Wills (abstracts) 1736 to 1742

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Saturday, October 14, 2017

Did you like what you Disovered about your Ancestors? #virginiapioneersnet #genealogy

Did you Like what you Discovered about your Ancestors?

plowing with oxenDiscovering the past is interesting. It concerns earlier times and how people handled good and bad situations. Sometimes we think that we are in the worst of times, however, a glimpse into the past will awaken a new truth. The ancestors left foreign shores to come to America and hone out an existence in wilderness county full of hardships. For many centuries the average person lived to be about thirty or forty years of age. They died of disease and misfortune. Thousands of vessels did not reach America due to hurricanes, storms and unforeseen navigational errors. Such vessels are being discovered in ocean graves. Emigrants were not necessarily greeted by friendly Indians. Despite the wonderful story of John Smith and Pocahontas, Powhatan's tribes raved the Virginia peninsula in 1622/3 and killed all but a handful of the first settlers. Some historians will have you believe that the Europeans brought African slaves to tell this lands. Not so. Instead, they brought family members and white indentured servants. For this trouble and expense, they receive land grants. This was the situation during most of the 17th century. So what did these settlers build in so short a life span? In Virginia, they invested in their plantations more so than the home place while contributing to the community in building roads, attending church and supporting the local glebe by paying tithing (tobacco). Also, every man over 21 years of age was expected to serve in the local militia and help to protect the home place. Remember the rebel Nathaniel Bacon? He organized a small army of men to rid the area of marauding and scalping Indians when the Royal Governor refused to do so. Afterwards, was hanged. From all indications of private study into Virginia lineages, it would appear that the very reason that people left their English roots where nobility ruled, was to have a better life. The royal governors were no fine example of fairness. Although Berkeley ended up being recalled, his successor was not an improvement. Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, Virginians were constrained to pay taxes and tariffs to the English for incoming supplies. The English Laws were continuously redrafted to hold the colonists in check. American history is fascinating, especially when one realizes how his ancestors played a part in the drama. The genealogist probably knows more of the intricate details of history than anyone else and such knowledge is invaluable in discovering one's roots. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:
  • Bonds, 1730 to 1751
  • 1750 to 1854
Digital Images of Goochland County Wills 1741 to 1745 

Testators: Atkinson, Robert;Ballenger, Joseph; Bell, David ;Christian, Thomas;Cunningham, James; Dillon, William; Dupuy, Bartholomew; Ford, Peter; Harrar, William ;Holland, Michael; Holland, Michael the elder to Michael, Jr. (deed); Horros, William; Marton, Peter ;Mayo, William ;Meriwether, Nicholas ;Parrish, Humphrey Sr. ;Payne, George ;Purkins, Abram ; Randolph, William ;Sampson, Francis ;Spear, John ;Taylor, Charles; Trabue, Anthony

Digital Images of Goochland County Wills 1745 to 1749

Testators: Butler, Edmond; Carter, Edward; Clements, Stephen; Coleman, Samuel ;Cox, Sarah; Easly, John ;Hix, John ; Holland, Michael (deed); James, Francis ;Levillain, Jean ;Levillain, John ;Lockett, Thomas ;Mogginson, William ;Morgain, Robert ;Mosby, Richard ;Netherland, Sarah ;Phelps, John ; Randolph, William ;Turpin, Obedience ;Warron, Daniel 

Will Abstracts
  • Wills (abstracts) 1736 to 1742

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Friday, October 13, 2017

Carter County TN Wills, Estates, etc. added to 8 Genealogy Websites #southeasterngenealogy


Doe Ridge Gorge in Carter County TN

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:
  • Carter County TN Genealogy Resources
  • Images o Wills 1794-1830
  • Administrator Bonds 1865 to 1876
  • Settlements of Administrators/Guardians 1856 to 1909
  • Insolvent Estates 1836 to 1872
  • Bonds 1878 to 1969

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Do you know yourself? #genealogy #northcarolinapioneers

Who Are You?

question MarkSo many answers are at our disposal now! Freedom is a precious heritage won by our Ancestors! But do we really know who we are? To learn some answers about ourselves we must look into the past, into the lives of those who brought us here. Discovering ancestors is not only fun, but surprising. The lineage doubles every generation (into the past), which makes for an unlimited resource of ancestors who were part of the histories which we study today. For example, it is easy to trace the lineage back to a Revolutionary War Soldier. Gosh! The pension itself is loaded with information about the battles they fought and famous officers they served with. You just don't know how this goes, until you read the pension. Then, there are the Civil War Pensions. Of course, the old wills, estates, deeds, tax digests really open the puzzle to a wonderfully new perspective. The old script used is beautifully executed with a quill and india ink. Some of these documents are simply worth framing! The census records are not enough. To find ancestors, one must also research county records where your ancestors resided or where you thought they were. This is a must! For one thing, the records, such as wills, estates, marriages, inventories, sales, guardian ships will provide names of heirs. Additionally, the tiny details which lead to the next source. For example, in the estate of Henry Holland of Jasper County, an Annual Return made by the administrator revealed a letter sent to Holland, Virginia. From there, it was easy to find this place as the family seat. Another resource are receipts from heirs sometimes found in the estates, including husbands of the daughters. Of course, if you look in the marriage records, that is where the marriage was recorded with the name and full date of the record. The 8 genealogy websites contain county records easy to view online! First, become a member, then view/print/download your ancestor's old will or estate. It is really cool!

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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Gallatin County KY Genealogy #southeasterngenealogy

Gallatin County Wills, Estates, Inventories, Distributions, Guardianships

Gallatin County Kentucky Map

Gallatin was founded in 1798 and named for Albert Gallatin, the Secretary of the Treasury under President Thomas Jefferson. It was derived from parts of Franklin and Shelby counties. Later, parts of the county were pared off to create three additional counties, viz: Owen in 1819, Trimble in 1836 and Carroll in 1838. 

New Additions to 8 Genealogy Websites:
Gallatin County KY Genealogy Resources 
  • Images of Gallatin County KY Wills & Estates 1800 to 1819; 1817 to 1823


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